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My Life With Chaplin Lita Grey Chaplin : DOC

Lita Grey Chaplin

I love the idea of getting a window into Charlie Chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. The man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

Books like this one, written by his second wife Lita Grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. In this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in Chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. Just a couple of years before, Chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “Because we have two grown sons of whom I am very fond, I will not go into any details. For two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” Grey then worked with Morton Cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. In reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of Chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. He took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “Flirting Angel” in the dream sequence of “The Kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. He got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. They had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. It’s disturbing that Chaplin had also married his first wife, Mildred Harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

Many of the interesting bits in the book I had to wonder about. Unfortunately, Grey was not specific as to which elements she and Cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. Chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. It’s maddening that Grey blamed Cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about Chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

It’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9M in today’s dollars). She became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as Lita Grey Chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. She had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. She was married and divorced three more times in her life. None of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as Charlie Chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. Video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

Here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- In the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in Mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. While it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- At age 12, Chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in Sir Joshua Reynolds painting ‘Age of Innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. This one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- After an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in Truckee while they were on location to film ‘The Gold Rush’, and later on a beach, Chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the Santa Monica Swimming Club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. Details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. She also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for Chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- In an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and Chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what Errol Flynn had with Beverly Aadland. Flynn was 48 and Aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. This doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- She says that Chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. She also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming Pola Negri, Claire Windsor, Peggy Hopkins Joyce, Edna Purviance, and Marion Davies. She says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. While all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- She alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with William Randolph Hearst to have her killed. This is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). Some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- She describes reading “Fanny Hill” from his library, whose sex scenes Chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. Then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” Again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and Chaplin’s cruelty.

- Her accounts of celebrity behavior at Hearst’s palace at San Simeon, including comments she has Hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘Citizen Kane’ to be true. Similarly, there is a scene with a drunken John Barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about Chaplin having an affair with Marion Davies? Her discussions with Davies, meetings with Garbo, and Negri? All impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- Similarly her statements about Chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on Hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- In her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in California at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with Andrea Gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. She turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized America in 1927. I think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- Likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. She loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- Some of the aspects that Chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the Charleston with them when Chaplin came home, outraged. It really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- Years later she states Chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to Oona]. I’m sorry I wasn’t able to be a real husband.” This entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on Chaplin’s own autobiography, and Grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage Chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped America in the 1950’s.

As I peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into Chaplin Grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. In the earlier chapters I felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when I read about Grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. The more you think about both Chaplin and Grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. For my part, I liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad I read her account, despite the serious misgivings.

284

When mike tells phoebe that he never wants to marry again, hank azaria returns as david "the scientist guy, " a character my life with chaplin originated in the first season. The hotel is nice and clean with all the facilities that you need but the lita grey chaplin position an islad with no traffic on it the beautifull nature is exeptional. Local officials in many parts my life with chaplin of the country have refused to acknowledge suspected outbreaks of the disease in order to avoid paying culling subsidies, reporters have learned. The water line was freezing up, lita grey chaplin we would defrost the line. Metabolic depression in animals: physiological perspectives and biochemical my life with chaplin generalizations. lita grey chaplin you have overcome obstacles and have now gained the strength you need to continue against the current. Bursar also helps to teach members about money my life with chaplin management. Sep 09, bluetiful hadeel rated it really liked my life with chaplin it shelves: manga, graphic-novel, in-my-library.

Do my life with chaplin not forget to use a network connection fast enough to download files. Adesign defect in the dvd drive used in the xbox lita grey chaplin can cause it to cease recognizing that a xbox game disc has been inserted because too great a space exists between the laser reading the game disc and the disc itself. my life with chaplin bernard kruger - has rejoined the choir as music director from the choir is known for its african repertoire, containing works like "shosholoza", and "night sounds" where the choir imitates the sounds of the african bush. Tm41 helping hand 20 the user assists an ally my life with chaplin by boosting the power of that ally's attack. The partnership allows us to tackle the issue head on my life with chaplin and provide the first line of defence for equipment owners. The host was waiting for us a few hours earlier than check-in time, and i'm my life with chaplin very grateful for it. It's hard to decide which is more pleasing the clever text by pat alvarado, or the adventurously colorful illustrations by fernando pena moran. lita grey chaplin Finally, those who cannot speak or understand the language represent lita grey chaplin the remaining. On february 8, the day my life with chaplin before he would have been placed on the marine corps " deserter list ", he turned himself in to marine captain robert dunlap, commanding officer of c company. It will be appreciated that in some embodiments remote incident response system lita grey chaplin may be an application service provider that provides computer-based services to participating entities e.

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All forward-looking statements reflect our present expectation of future events and are subject to 284 a number of important factors and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Its 284 surface is buffed to a brightly polished finish for added shine. That figure is way up from past years' savings, because of new voting laws i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. which would require the dis- trict to rent extra voting equipment from medina county. This technique is a i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. safe and reliable method with the minimum time required. Official thenenequirer twitter feed covering i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. all things northampton town. And if you're looking for a really unique and memorable way to wish someone a happy 50th birthday, then do check out our 50th birthday 284 message posters. It should also be noted that you can "park" a beefalo using a salt lick and they i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. will not follow the player or lose any stats that have been gained. Edison later invented the entire electric utility system to deliver light to homes through a network 284 of wires. Then as i said, in the very first point, the returning mimetype in 284 the request can be wrong: i have an example of you could find in the header sometimes wrong example .

I love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. the program will limit your changes to what it thinks is safe to use. 284 who knows how many other games there are that could be adapted for your target language! Grenswachters van de pedagogiek 1 2 ivo van hilvoorde grenswachters van de pedagogiek demarcatie en disciplinevorming in de ontwikkeling van de nederlandse academische pedagogiek 3 foto omslag: philip kohnstamm en zijn vrouw an kohnstamm-kessler met hun oudste dochter. Baffled i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. by the neverending criminal activity, generational drug issues, etc. However, shredder and krang's incompetence as i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. well as their relative sanity is fully shown when the utrom shredder of the universe seizes command of the technodrome and adds utrom technology to the powerful war machine, and turns it against the world. Elegant line mosque and moon design for eid mubarak starline 6k. i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. As well as carrying the 284 weight of our body, our feet must also absorb increased impact and strain as we carry out our daily activities. In some cases choirs join up to 284 become one "mass" choir that performs for a special concert. If you have extra room on your harness, you can attach them to make the process slightly easier. Nightshade is poisonous wilted fruit tree leaves can also kill 284 goats.

Mary Kom

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My Life With Chaplin Lita Grey Chaplin : EBOOK

Lita Grey Chaplin

I love the idea of getting a window into Charlie Chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. The man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

Books like this one, written by his second wife Lita Grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. In this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in Chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. Just a couple of years before, Chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “Because we have two grown sons of whom I am very fond, I will not go into any details. For two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” Grey then worked with Morton Cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. In reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of Chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. He took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “Flirting Angel” in the dream sequence of “The Kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. He got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. They had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. It’s disturbing that Chaplin had also married his first wife, Mildred Harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

Many of the interesting bits in the book I had to wonder about. Unfortunately, Grey was not specific as to which elements she and Cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. Chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. It’s maddening that Grey blamed Cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about Chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

It’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9M in today’s dollars). She became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as Lita Grey Chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. She had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. She was married and divorced three more times in her life. None of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as Charlie Chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. Video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

Here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- In the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in Mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. While it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- At age 12, Chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in Sir Joshua Reynolds painting ‘Age of Innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. This one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- After an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in Truckee while they were on location to film ‘The Gold Rush’, and later on a beach, Chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the Santa Monica Swimming Club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. Details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. She also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for Chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- In an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and Chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what Errol Flynn had with Beverly Aadland. Flynn was 48 and Aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. This doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- She says that Chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. She also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming Pola Negri, Claire Windsor, Peggy Hopkins Joyce, Edna Purviance, and Marion Davies. She says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. While all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- She alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with William Randolph Hearst to have her killed. This is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). Some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- She describes reading “Fanny Hill” from his library, whose sex scenes Chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. Then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” Again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and Chaplin’s cruelty.

- Her accounts of celebrity behavior at Hearst’s palace at San Simeon, including comments she has Hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘Citizen Kane’ to be true. Similarly, there is a scene with a drunken John Barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about Chaplin having an affair with Marion Davies? Her discussions with Davies, meetings with Garbo, and Negri? All impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- Similarly her statements about Chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on Hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- In her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in California at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with Andrea Gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. She turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized America in 1927. I think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- Likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. She loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- Some of the aspects that Chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the Charleston with them when Chaplin came home, outraged. It really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- Years later she states Chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to Oona]. I’m sorry I wasn’t able to be a real husband.” This entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on Chaplin’s own autobiography, and Grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage Chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped America in the 1950’s.

As I peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into Chaplin Grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. In the earlier chapters I felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when I read about Grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. The more you think about both Chaplin and Grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. For my part, I liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad I read her account, despite the serious misgivings.

284

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This course may not be challenged and may i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. not be substituted for required mathematics credit. I think you will find that here is no more measurable, scalable, and high impact way 284 to educate the world. That forward assist had something to do with a round stuck in the chamber and 284 an extractor that pulled over the rim. Video: nebivolol route of synthesis of 284 dibenzalacetone synthesis of dibenzalacetone. Sheffield, illinois category list of towns and villages in illinois. 284 What a smart idea i am doing mine today i have 14 feather babies and would be devastated i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. if anything were to happen. We are met, gentlemen, upon the seventieth birthday of a man and poet whose fame is dear to us i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. all, but whose modesty at first feared too much the ordeal by praise to consent to his meeting with us. In case you were missing some transferwise activities in 284 budapest, then i have good news for you! I think ian gillan in his brief tenure managed to bring a little of both, 284 along with, of course, some strengths of his own as well, of course. At first i thought i wanted to try something new in making the sauce for this fettuccine, but when i think again, the 284 people in this house, cant accept new taste if they are not familiar with

Maybe it's the refreshing eucalyptus-y scent of the blue astringent herbal lotion, or how soft 284 their freshly-shorn faces feel with their shaving cream and a slather of the ultimate facial cream of which i've heard justin timberlake is a fan, and he has a pretty good face, no? Also, pujols led the cardinals by going 3-for-4 with a double. The original i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings.
estimates of the timing and amount of loss payments are periodically analyzed against actual experience and revised based on an actuarial evaluation of the expected remaining losses. This scholarship can be taken at universities in united states us. Gene ontology go allows for some exchangeability of functional information across i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. orthologs. For example, endothelial cells create intricate spiderweb-like networks on i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. matrigel coated surfaces but not on plastic surfaces. Synthesis of deuterated surfactants 284 for european users m Much credit to director john crowley and screenwriter nick hornby for keeping sappy out of this tale of an irish girl coming to america in. Shelby come to me youtube video, ana gabriel amiga con letra y 284 video de lazy. Purported to date back to ancient times, it recognizes the indian buddhist monk bodhidharma as the first patriarch, though not 284 its creator. And i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. then deokman pops up with her cute blue soldier uniform and suicidal tendencies and the wheels of fate start aligning. The estimated mortality 284 rate for all laparoscopic bowel procedures is 3. The device may be otherwise oriented rotated 90 degrees or at other orientations and the spatially relative descriptors used herein 284 are interpreted accordingly.

Mary Kom

Mary Kom

How KDS made a difference

My Life With Chaplin Lita Grey Chaplin | EPUB

Lita Grey Chaplin

I love the idea of getting a window into Charlie Chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. The man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

Books like this one, written by his second wife Lita Grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. In this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in Chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. Just a couple of years before, Chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “Because we have two grown sons of whom I am very fond, I will not go into any details. For two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” Grey then worked with Morton Cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. In reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of Chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. He took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “Flirting Angel” in the dream sequence of “The Kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. He got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. They had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. It’s disturbing that Chaplin had also married his first wife, Mildred Harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

Many of the interesting bits in the book I had to wonder about. Unfortunately, Grey was not specific as to which elements she and Cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. Chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. It’s maddening that Grey blamed Cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about Chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

It’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9M in today’s dollars). She became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as Lita Grey Chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. She had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. She was married and divorced three more times in her life. None of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as Charlie Chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. Video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

Here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- In the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in Mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. While it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- At age 12, Chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in Sir Joshua Reynolds painting ‘Age of Innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. This one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- After an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in Truckee while they were on location to film ‘The Gold Rush’, and later on a beach, Chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the Santa Monica Swimming Club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. Details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. She also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for Chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- In an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and Chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what Errol Flynn had with Beverly Aadland. Flynn was 48 and Aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. This doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- She says that Chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. She also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming Pola Negri, Claire Windsor, Peggy Hopkins Joyce, Edna Purviance, and Marion Davies. She says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. While all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- She alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with William Randolph Hearst to have her killed. This is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). Some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- She describes reading “Fanny Hill” from his library, whose sex scenes Chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. Then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” Again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and Chaplin’s cruelty.

- Her accounts of celebrity behavior at Hearst’s palace at San Simeon, including comments she has Hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘Citizen Kane’ to be true. Similarly, there is a scene with a drunken John Barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about Chaplin having an affair with Marion Davies? Her discussions with Davies, meetings with Garbo, and Negri? All impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- Similarly her statements about Chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on Hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- In her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in California at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with Andrea Gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. She turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized America in 1927. I think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- Likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. She loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- Some of the aspects that Chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the Charleston with them when Chaplin came home, outraged. It really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- Years later she states Chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to Oona]. I’m sorry I wasn’t able to be a real husband.” This entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on Chaplin’s own autobiography, and Grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage Chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped America in the 1950’s.

As I peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into Chaplin Grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. In the earlier chapters I felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when I read about Grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. The more you think about both Chaplin and Grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. For my part, I liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad I read her account, despite the serious misgivings.

284

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Be a part of this 2 weeks special volunteer i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. program and make a difference. 284 we will review the documents approximately within a week. Once you've chosen a lender, gather all the documents you'll 284 need to put in an application. The generally acceptable oer mechanism is the four-electron associative mechanism in i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings.
alkaline media. Mephistopheles agrees: on earth faust will be master, but in the world below roles 284 will be reversed. Age: adult, senior directions: west th street an open level class with a focus on bringing awareness to the body through core strengthening i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. and total body flexibility. A couple of days in the napa valley might be all you need to unwind and enjoy some i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. romance with your loved one. Move through the vents and 284 collect the 2nd clown near the bed. 284 retrieved 10 may i thought it was a song about speedballing. Getting 284 to travel around the world to martial art schools, you see all the differences.

Update your sss account asap before you resume your contributions. Video: gant pique dame hvorostovsky hvorostovsky ja vas lyublyu queen of spades tchaikovsky the world famous russian baritone made his western operatic debut at the nice opera in tchaikovsky's pique dame, and his career rapidly expanded to. Their higher abundance here in march-april, during higher oxygen levels, could be explained by a requirement of egg-carrying females to reduce the energy investment for oxygenating their eggs, as has been observed i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. for other crustaceans 67. Never ride without a ticket they are regularly checked and you could be slapped with a fine for not having i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. a valid ticket. Measure the width along i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. the base and then the height of the triangle also known as slant length from the central point on the base to the apex. Grain usually comes from using 284 a high iso which was called film speed in the film era. Pre-order items combined with items in stock if you place i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. an order which consists of multiple items, the items are not normally despatched until the whole order is complete. They were to provide as much meat as possible, at the lowest possible price, and quickly. 284 The city of savannah is offering downtown workers a flexible form of transportation through the use of the iphone and android app "downtowner" 284 which offers on demand rides within the downtown area. Based in the south in a modern premises with a 10 barrel plant, the company sell wholesale to Businesses, clubs and other groups looking for meeting space can rent the park's six shelters. The pioneering development of the scientific method by the arab ash'ari polymath ibn al-haytham alhacen was an important contribution to the philosophy of science. 284 the results of these interventions range from testimonies that indicate improvement to claims and lawsuits for deception and fraud due to ineffectiveness, unwanted effects or even death krmpotic, grippo. Een stilist of stylist is iemand die stijladvies geeft aan anderen, bijvoorbeeld op het gebied van kleding mode, of die spullen uitkiest en rangschikt volgens een bepaalde stijl, zoals een woningstilist. Garza said the crash also killed their father, jim hansen sr. The report's predictions for how things will be after 284 are also politically problematic for the german government.

Mary Kom

Mary Kom

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My Life With Chaplin Lita Grey Chaplin - Download PDF

Lita Grey Chaplin

I love the idea of getting a window into Charlie Chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. The man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

Books like this one, written by his second wife Lita Grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. In this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in Chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. Just a couple of years before, Chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “Because we have two grown sons of whom I am very fond, I will not go into any details. For two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” Grey then worked with Morton Cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. In reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of Chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. He took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “Flirting Angel” in the dream sequence of “The Kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. He got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. They had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. It’s disturbing that Chaplin had also married his first wife, Mildred Harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

Many of the interesting bits in the book I had to wonder about. Unfortunately, Grey was not specific as to which elements she and Cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. Chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. It’s maddening that Grey blamed Cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about Chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

It’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9M in today’s dollars). She became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as Lita Grey Chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. She had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. She was married and divorced three more times in her life. None of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as Charlie Chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. Video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

Here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- In the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in Mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. While it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- At age 12, Chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in Sir Joshua Reynolds painting ‘Age of Innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. This one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- After an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in Truckee while they were on location to film ‘The Gold Rush’, and later on a beach, Chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the Santa Monica Swimming Club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. Details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. She also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for Chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- In an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and Chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what Errol Flynn had with Beverly Aadland. Flynn was 48 and Aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. This doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- She says that Chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. She also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming Pola Negri, Claire Windsor, Peggy Hopkins Joyce, Edna Purviance, and Marion Davies. She says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. While all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- She alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with William Randolph Hearst to have her killed. This is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). Some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- She describes reading “Fanny Hill” from his library, whose sex scenes Chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. Then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” Again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and Chaplin’s cruelty.

- Her accounts of celebrity behavior at Hearst’s palace at San Simeon, including comments she has Hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘Citizen Kane’ to be true. Similarly, there is a scene with a drunken John Barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about Chaplin having an affair with Marion Davies? Her discussions with Davies, meetings with Garbo, and Negri? All impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- Similarly her statements about Chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on Hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- In her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in California at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with Andrea Gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. She turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized America in 1927. I think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- Likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. She loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- Some of the aspects that Chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the Charleston with them when Chaplin came home, outraged. It really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- Years later she states Chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to Oona]. I’m sorry I wasn’t able to be a real husband.” This entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on Chaplin’s own autobiography, and Grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage Chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped America in the 1950’s.

As I peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into Chaplin Grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. In the earlier chapters I felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when I read about Grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. The more you think about both Chaplin and Grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. For my part, I liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad I read her account, despite the serious misgivings.

284

As the interview is drawing to a close, i ask howe what he would have said six years ago, just before lita grey chaplin his first spell at bournemouth, if someone had told him the club would be where they are today. Outside of the above mentioned ideas, we need to have the my life with chaplin ability to cost effectively run background and license checks. Team lita grey chaplin mercadel has given me the chance to take my game to the next level on ans off the court. Since point clouds often reveal some of the shape of the 3d scene they can be used as a reference for placing synthetic objects or by a reconstruction program to create lita grey chaplin a 3d version of the actual scene. If you are an ambitious candidate who is willing to grab life by the lapels, you can opt for commercial pilot my life with chaplin training in bangalore to gain the right expertise and skills. He wielded a staff, unlike the original zodac who carried a laser gun. lita grey chaplin Location: schiesstattbrucke at the beginning of the salzberger strasse leading my life with chaplin to the obersalzberg. The domestic my life with chaplin ferries security regulations also came into force in to increase the level of protection for 18 domestic ferry routes and 29 ferry facilities across canada.

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The centrality of economic expansion is often lost 284 in the heated ideological debates in india. The unit shipped promptly and i was able i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. to schedule delivery within a 2 hour window. You can locate your kids on a map without ever making 284 a call. They also supervise medical i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. record and health information technicians. Frequently asked questions q: why do i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. the characters look different from the live action films? 284 good stay subir dutta room was spacious with updated amenities. Hardware requirements a more comprehensive list of compatible computer hardware is provided on the digidesign 284 web site. If that spell is 284 countered this way, exile it instead of putting it into its owner's graveyard. Originality, diversity that are 284 relevant in terms of promoting tourism of spain abroad. An adaptive encoding will try to detect frequently updated screen regions, and send updates in these regions using a lossy encoding like 284 jpeg. Bajaj set a new benchmark for success in as they sold 284 5 lakh vehicles that year.

West virginia resident permits only i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. and at least 21 years old. Haven't listened to any of ulver's work since their original black metal records, and i am pleasantly surprised at how well the construction and pace of this new one. Biocide repellent spray with geraniol for mites, i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. bed bugs and fleas! The sound of music is one of the biggest hits in hollywood history. Besides his i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. native english, speaks correctly french, italian and spanish. The dot latch is a d-type flip-flop that accepts the output of the shift register element. i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. We also coordinate and align objectives at both the state and national level so participating hospitals 284 can focus on improving patient care. If warren wins the presidency, the market declines 20 to 30 percent: marc lasry. The researchers concluded that panitumumab was superior to cetuximab in projected drug acquisition costs, mode of administration, and safety outcomes, for patients with wild-type kras 284 who have mcrc. Titarenko, who was trained under the program in moscow habbard centre, and then has broken off openly his relation with scientology church, having convinced in negative consequences of its activity. The tottenham defender suffered a worrying head injury in his side's defeat to ajax on tuesday night. The unit has an internal fuse protection so if yours ever doesn't i love the idea of getting a window into charlie chaplin’s personal life, even if it’s voyeuristic of me. the man was a genius with such an extraordinary sense of humanity in his films, that to understand more of him as a complete person, even one with flaws, is interesting to me.

books like this one, written by his second wife lita grey in 1966, have to be accurate though. in this case, we obviously only have one side of the story, presented by a woman biased in all the usual kinds of ways for an autobiographer, and from her writing, clearly with a need of wanting to be more important than she was in chaplin’s life and in the entertainment world. just a couple of years before, chaplin wrote his own autobiography and nearly completely omitted her, except to say that “because we have two grown sons of whom i am very fond, i will not go into any details. for two years we were married and tried to make a go of it, but it was hopeless and ended in a great deal of bitterness.” grey then worked with morton cooper, who by her own admission later amplified the salacious bits and distorted the truth in ways which are now very hard to disentangle. in reading statements of fact and verbatim dialog in the book four decades after it supposedly occurred, one has to constantly be questioning whether it’s true, and that’s problematic.

that’s not to say we shouldn’t believe the fundamental story of chaplin’s statutory rape of this young woman, because those facts are indisputable. he took an odd interest her when she was 12, made her the “flirting angel” in the dream sequence of “the kid”, and then later pursued her sexually when she was 15. he got her pregnant, and at 16 was forced by her family under threat of legal action to marry her. they had two sons but a very unhappy marriage, and divorced in bitterness a little less than three years later. it’s disturbing that chaplin had also married his first wife, mildred harris, before her 17th birthday, which indicates a pattern.

many of the interesting bits in the book i had to wonder about. unfortunately, grey was not specific as to which elements she and cooper lied about while she was preparing her second memoir, which was published a few years after her death in the 1990’s. chaplin to my knowledge never dignified the book with a comment, possibly because it was a quagmire which also included truths and partial truths he preferred to leave buried. it’s maddening that grey blamed cooper for the falsehoods, and it was eerily reminiscent of her blaming her lawyers for the statements they made about chaplin’s “perversion” and “unnatural desires” in their divorce proceedings in 1927.

it’s not that she casts herself in an entirely angelic light, and she describes many things she did in her life that she was not proud of, including foolishly squandering a divorce settlement which until then was the largest in history (after lawyer’s fees and setting aside the trust fund for the kids, nearly $9m in today’s dollars). she became an alcoholic and was on the road trying to make a living as an entertainer (billing herself as lita grey chaplin) while her two sons were raised remotely. she had breakdowns and received many rounds of electroconvulsive shock therapy while committed. she was married and divorced three more times in her life. none of these things are particularly interesting in the later chapters as charlie chaplin is no longer on the scene, but they do help flesh out a portrait of this woman, and what to me seems a pathetic life, despite her optimism at the end. video interviews of her from the 1990’s show her in a positive light though, a survivor and somewhat philosophical.

here are some other tidbits that stuck out:

- in the prologue, she makes the extraordinary allegation that while on the train back from their shotgun marriage in mexico, he suggested that she jump off the train to kill herself and their unborn child, to spare themselves a life of misery. while it’s easy to believe he suggested an abortion and also tried to buy her off with $20,000 to avoid marriage, this one is hard to swallow.

- at age 12, chaplin was entranced by her eyes and her resemblance to what he saw in sir joshua reynolds painting ‘age of innocence’ (1788), so he had her sit for a portrait. this one is disturbing but very believable and almost certainly true, as there is a photo of her posing for it.

- after an attempt to have sex with her in his hotel room in truckee while they were on location to film ‘the gold rush’, and later on a beach, chaplin continued grooming her, taking her to the santa monica swimming club, and eventually succeeded in deflowering her in the steam room of his mansion. details about specific dialogue aside, this account is believable. she also describes her mixed feelings of confusion and lust for chaplin, and her naïve belief that if she didn’t have an orgasm, she couldn’t get pregnant, in ways that are entirely believable.

- in an aside, she tries to distinguish what she and chaplin had as being fundamentally different, and more elevated, from what errol flynn had with beverly aadland. flynn was 48 and aadland was 15 when they met and became lovers before he died at 50. this doesn’t seem like an outright lie, but just wishful thinking more than truth.

- she says that chaplin referred to himself as a “stallion” and for good reason, as during their marriage he could make love six times in a night, with just five minutes rest in between. she also says his high sex drive led to numerous affairs, and doesn’t hold back in naming pola negri, claire windsor, peggy hopkins joyce, edna purviance, and marion davies. she says that because “he was a human sex machine” (lol) she couldn’t tell if he’d had sex with someone else earlier in the day because of his incredible ability to perform. while all of this is probably exaggerated and played up for its full shock value, the central gist of it, that he had high drive and had affairs, is believable.

- she alleges later that at the time of the divorce, in a fit of anger he threatened to use his power and connections with william randolph hearst to have her killed. this is the culmination of years of cruelty, lack of respect, and the one-sidedness of their relationship, stemming from his feeling of having been trapped and being resentful about it (his own damn fault of course). some of this seems exaggerated, some of it rings true.

- she describes reading “fanny hill” from his library, whose sex scenes chaplin had underlined, and which inspired some passion between them, as did an interval after childbirth where she was sexually voracious. then again, she says that they slept apart, and on the occasions when he summoned her to his bedroom, she felt “increasingly like the whore he’d called me” and “more often than not, during that period, he simply expended his passion in me and dismissed me.” again, parts of this may be the truth, and parts may be an attempt on her part to both play up both the salacious aspects and chaplin’s cruelty.

- her accounts of celebrity behavior at hearst’s palace at san simeon, including comments she has hearst making, seem too literally borrowed from ‘citizen kane’ to be true. similarly, there is a scene with a drunken john barrymore, who indeed was an alcoholic, but does he really speak all of the lines that come out of his mouth in this book, coming on to her and also clueing her in about chaplin having an affair with marion davies? her discussions with davies, meetings with garbo, and negri? all impossible to know, but certainly questionable.

- similarly her statements about chaplin’s directing style, or her other comments on hollywood figures, really don’t seem to have a whole lot of value, despite her own sense of importance, since her brief career and exposure to the industry essentially ended with her divorce.

- in her descriptions of their sex life she alludes to two things that were spun out of all control in the divorce papers against him: (1) his desire that she perform fellatio on him, which was astonishingly illegal in california at the time, and (2) his desire that the two of them have a ménage à trois with andrea gatesbry, a young poet who he heard was sexually adventurous. she turns both of these things down and he doesn’t force her, but then she didn’t stop her lawyers from alluding to and condemning his “perversions”, which scandalized america in 1927. i think it’s sad that his reputation was further tarnished from this innuendo (not that the underage sex shouldn’t have been condemned), and don’t believe her when she says it was not her intention.

- likewise, she says she wanted none of his money, then later asked for only a pittance ($10,000) to support her kids, which seems patently false. she loved the good life, as evidenced by her living it up to an extreme after the divorce.

- some of the aspects that chaplin and his lawyers accused her of at the time of their divorce, including partying, drinking, and essentially being an unfit mother, which she bitterly denied, seem to have played out in her life that way, making one wonder about her statement that the only instance of this that occurred during their marriage was innocently bringing some young kids over to their home one night and then dancing the charleston with them when chaplin came home, outraged. it really seems like there is another side of the story that was untold here.

- years later she states chaplin was kind to her in getting her to seek help, telling her that he had “really loved only two women – you and the girl who’s my wife now [referring to oona]. i’m sorry i wasn’t able to be a real husband.” this entire incident and specific quote are very, very hard to believe, based on chaplin’s own autobiography, and grey herself just pages later vacillating on whether she would attempt to damage chaplin in hearings associated with the irrational fear of communism that gripped america in the 1950’s.

as i peruse all of these points (and apologize to anyone who has actually read this far for my verbosity), you can tell it’s a lot to process, and the recurring theme is when we’re getting this window into chaplin grey in the 1920’s, just how many layers of distortion are in between us and the truth, and whether what we’re seeing is an impressionist painting that while fuzzy contains the essence, or if it’s entirely too fictional to be taken seriously. in the earlier chapters i felt it was mostly believable, but my confidence eroded as time went on, and it suffered a bigger blow when i read about grey’s own admission that parts were misleading. the more you think about both chaplin and grey, the less you might like either one of them – or the more you may appreciate that most people are complicated, and should neither be deified nor vilified. for my part, i liked finding this first edition hardback copy with a nice set of pictures in the center, and am glad i read her account, despite the serious misgivings. power up you may want to check the fuse. Also stay connected even if 284 you are travelling through poor network areas with our free wifi facility. All vehicular traffic 284 is isolated on different levels. Emergency department ultrasonography in the evaluation of hypotensive and normotensive children with 284 blunt abdominal trauma.